A day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day, his legacy can still be felt in the annual National Day of Racial Healing. Tuesday, Jan. 18, is observed as the National Day of Racial Healing, which is a part of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation effort.

The seventh annual national event — recognized now for the third year in Arkansas includes virtual and in-person community events and watch parties across the country, bringing together artists, activists, faith healers and civic leaders. The day serves as an invitation for the public to engage in honest dialogue about how we can create an equitable society, with 2022 activities spanning the full week.

"While we all need to be fully engaged in the act of seeking truth and racial healing, no matter what demographics describe us, this transformational work is not for us. It is for the next seven generations," says Kwami Abdul-Bey, co-convenor of the Arkansas Peace & Justice Memorial Movement (APJMM), one of the NDORH sponsors in Arkansas.

"We have to roll up our sleeves and work together to transform this mess that we have gotten ourselves into because of our race so that our children and grandchildren do not have to live in a world where they are inclined to repeat our mistakes. This is why we observe the National Day of Racial Healing in the State of Arkansas."

Learn more about APJMM in our October 2020 cover story.

 

There are more than two dozen NDORH events around central Arkansas. Here are a few ways you can join in on this year's activities:

Monday, Jan. 17

10 a.m - MLK Challenge 2022: Building the Beloved Community. More info here.

 

Tuesday, Jan. 18

9 a.m. - National Day of Racial Healing in the state of Arkansas press conference. More info here.

noon - 2022 Advancing Equity Award Ceremony. More info here.

2 p.m. - W.K. Kellogg Foundation National Day of Racial Healing event hosted by Soledad O’Brien. More info here.

5:30 p.m. - Conway Conversations: Revisiting Broken Systems panel discussion featuring Dr. Kristy Carter, Dr. Taine Duncan and Dr. Marsha Massey. More info here.

6 p.m. - The Legacy of Emmett Till panel discussion featuring Dr. David Tell and Dr. Guy Lancaster. More info here.

7 p.m. - Religion’s Role in Racial Healing fireside chat featuring Dr. Jemar Tisby, Rev. Carissa Rodgers, Pastor Preston Clegg, Rev. Dr. Denise Donell, Rev. Monique Jones, Rev. Dustin McGowan and Rev. Ryan D. Davis, moderated by Kwami Abdul-Bey. More info here.

 

Thursday, Jan. 20

5 p.m. - UCA Downtown & Conway Art Walk present Racial Healing Through the Arts. More info here.

6 p.m. - The State of Diversity & Equity in Arkansas panel discussion featuring Dr. Dionne Jackson, attorney Tamika Edwards, Dr. Rebecca Glazier and Dr. Melvin Beavers, moderated by Donald Wood. More info here.

6 p.m. - Beyond Washington: A MTCC Event panel discussion featuring Rev. Dr. Denise Donell, Rev. Haley Jones, Pastor Preston Clegg and Kwami Abdul-Bey, moderated by Brian Rodgers. More info here.

 

Friday, Jan. 21

6 p.m. - Virtual Open Mic Night for Racial Healing hosted by M.C. Rob with special performance by Osyrus Bolly. More info here.

6:30 p.m. - Coming to the Table presents "Cousins: Connected Through Slavery, a Black Woman and a White Woman Discover Their Past — and Each Other" featuring authors Betty Kilby Baldwin and Phoebe Kilby. More info here.

 

Sunday, Jan. 23

11 p.m. - Little Rock Baha'i community presents a special community devotional and discussion on healing racism. More info here.

  

For more information about the National Day of Racial Healing, click here. You can also learn more about APJMM on the group's website and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for updates.